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Pavement pedantry




 

Dos and don’ts…

Dos and don'ts...

We’re taking another look at those pesky apostrophes…

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Pavement pedantry: a lot

Pavement pedantry: a lot

This one happens a lot

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Pavement pedantry: which vs. that

Pavement pedantry: which vs. that

We take on the ‘that’ vs. ‘which’ grammar debacle…

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To ‘boldly’ go where no pedant has gone before

To 'boldly' go where no pedant has gone before

Split infinitives are OK. In fact they are great (sometimes). There. We said it. Now to oh so eloquently explain why…

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Pavement Pedantry: programme vs. program

Pavement Pedantry: programme vs. program

Get with the programme people…

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Pavement pedantry: each other’s or each others’?

Pavement pedantry: each other's or each others'?

Did you scratch each others’ eyes out, or scratch each other’s eyes out? Hard to see the difference? Well it would be with no eyes…

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Pavement pedantry: passed or past?

Pavement pedantry: passed or past?

Remember how you passed the time? In the past? Or was it that you past the time? We doubt it. Commonly confused but very different, what’s the deal with passed and past?

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Pavement pedantry: fewer vs. less

Pavement pedantry: fewer vs. less

An unexpected item is in the bagging area – and it’s the word ‘less’.

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Pavement pedantry: normalcy vs. normality

Pavement pedantry: normalcy vs. normality

In this case of British vs. American usage, there actually are two ways about it. But what’s our verdict?

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Pavement pedantry: your vs. you’re

Pavement pedantry: your vs. you're

Your or you’re? Got it right? You’re sure?

 

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Pavement pedantry: buffaloed?

Pavement pedantry: buffaloed?

This week we’ve decided to lighten the gloom with a little homonym wordplay…

 

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Pavement pedantry: practising what we preach

Stranger Collective pavement pedantry

We might be swimming in Americanisms but one realm of our Brexicon remains yank free. Enter the ever confusing practice and practise

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Pavement pedantry: nailing our colours to the mast

Pavement pedantry: nailing our colours to the mast

Brexit schmexit…

 

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Pavement pedantry: elicit or illicit?

Pavement pedantry: elicit or illicit?

In the case of elicit and illicit, two little letters make a whole lotta difference. Cue pavement pedantry.

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Pavement pedantry: collective nouns – singular or plural?

Pavement pedantry: collective nouns – singular or plural?

Is a team one or many? Should staff be it or they? Pavement pedantry takes on collective nouns. Prepare for some brainache…

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Pavement pedantry: affect or effect?

Pavement pedantry: affect or effect?

Affect or effect? Get it wrong and the effect can be pretty affecting. So what’s right?

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Pavement pedantry: specific not pacific

Pavement pedantry: specific not pacific

Using pacific instead of specific. It makes us shudder when we hear it. But does metathesis mean specific’s days are numbered?

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Pavement pedantry: its not it’s

Pavement pedantry: its not it's

Its. It’s been the elephant in the room over the last month. So now we’re tackling it head on. Its. Its time has come.

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Pavement pedantry: everyday or every day?

Pavement pedantry: everyday or every day?

More pavement pedantry? It feels like there’s a post every day. Or is that everyday?

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Pavement pedantry: led not lead

Pavement pedantry: led not lead

English eh? Just when you think you’ve got a handle on it, it throws led at you…

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Pavement pedantry: in to vs. into

Pavement pedantry: in to vs. into

It’s confusing isn’t it? Two words (well three, actually) that sound the same but should be used differently. Here’s the lowdown…

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Pavement pedantry: start your sentence with and

Pavement pedantry: start your sentence with and

Every week, we share a point of pedantry from our pavement. This week, why it’s OK to start a sentence with and…

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